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20130126
20130203
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
is a major hang up in the space port's operations. adam howsley the of it in california, when nasa retired it's shuttles, it opened the door for this sort of thing, and it's now. >> nasa is opening up the doors, allowing everybody to work with them, a lot of it is still top secret, but they're allowing more and more companies and the prices are going down, and more dailytechnology, and it's all at it. >> regarding what nasa has to attract and offer to the private sector to come in and work with them, for whatever those reasons are, we don't really care. >> reporter: shep, we're talking about space hotels and orbits, and people can actually afford some of this stuff. >> shepard: how is california staying competitive in this race? >> reporter: well, they have 14 companies in mow havi and permission granted, you can come out here and try a couple of things. the virgin crew is it out here with some of their equipment and they have three warehouses out here, and a politician is pushing legislation. one company that we talked to is called x core. >> you can try new things, and it's always maintaine
a science lesson inspired by an announcement from nasa. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: just what is dark matter? find a short video with a simple answer on today's science roundup. nasa and the european space agency are partnering to send a telescope into space to investigate dark matter and dark energy. read more about these mysterious forces and what scientists hope to find on our science page. and think you've received bad advice about social security? our benefits guru gets to the bottom of that issue in today's "ask larry" column on our business page. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll return to the immigration debate with a look at the president's plans for reform. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
, four, three, two, one, zero. >> just had to show you this video this morning. this is nasa's new communications satellite being launched into space. this happened late last night in florida. it's going to be used to communicate with the astronauts living on the international space station. it will also be used to transfer images from the hubble space telescope. nasa's 11th time sending a tracking and delay shuttle into space. the first was in 1983. always awesome video. >> cool. >>> 5:21. final for weather & traffic on the 1s. meteorologist tom kierein with the forecast. what's going on out there? >> last night it was the rain which has exited. a few lingering sprinkles, prince george's, the district, fairfax county and loudoun county. temperatures are dropping into the 40s now to near 50. reagan national now down to 53. just an hour ago, it was at 60. the temperatures are rapidly dropping. much of prince george's county now in the low 50s. and we're going to continue to see the temperatures dropping throughout the day. storm team 4 four-day forecast will drop to the 30s after su
it is going to be, and if it hits us what kind of damage is it likely to do? >> well that's what nasa scientists are really going to be watching on this pass. next month on the 15th, this asteroid is going to swing just 17,000 miles away from earth at much lower than the navigation satellites and, that we use every day for tour phones and our gps. now it is not going to hit this time around, but such a close encounter of a rock this big, something like, 40 meters, meters wide, 50 meters wide, they haven't had this kind of a close encounter of a rock this size before. nasa will be watching it. scientists and astronomers will be tracking after it swings by to see how this close fly-by will change the orbit when it does come around again. martha: in your terms, these things happen, you know, every thousands of years, several thousands years. when was the last time something like this did actually make contact and what was the impact? >> well to give you some asteroid is about the same size as the rock that exploded over siberia in 1908. that event that leveled00 of square miles of land,
in florida. seven astronauts were killed minutes before they were set to arrive home. today nasa is honoring their memory and lives lost in previous missions in a day of remembrance. dr. steve harrigan is live at cape canaveral. >> a solemn day at the complex. a sense of remembering and sense of gratitude for those that gave their life in space exploration. three of the major tragedies in nasa occurring in different years but on in the same week beginning in 1967 with apollo one a fire claim the lives of three astronauts including gus grissom. then in 1986 the space shuttle challenger exploding after 73 seconds in flight. of course on board the challenger was the first teacher in space. it was later found that a faulty seal around a booster rocket was responsible for that crash. finally ten years ago today, this time it was the space shuttle columbia after a selling 16-day mission. that orbiter coming apart minutes away from home. some of the family members of the seven crew members here today to mark that with remembrance and gratitude trying to push the envelope. back to you. >> alisyn: i
to take down an out of control passenger on a plane. nasa space shuttles never left earth without it. >> i tell you, i think we'd be lost without duct tape up here. >> a bandit even used it when he robbed a liquor store. it's enough to give diapers a dirty name. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> you know that dogs are going to smell something. >> that's what i was just thinking, why, oh why, did these women, did anyone think they were going to be able to walk through an airport with cocaine on their tushies? >> put some tape on. >> i'm sure we can all feel bad, but i don't think 9, $10,000 is worth going to jail for a very long time. no more duct tape. >> you can always follow what's going on here in "the situation room." and we will be getting a lot of tweets. >> i'm sure about this last story, definitely. erin burnett "outfront" starts erin burnett "outfront" starts right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the nra's flip-flop of background checks. why they say they're against them now. plus, bob -- and the man who fooled manti te'o comes clean and talks about his real romantic f
. >> nasa marked three of the worst tragedies today. each occurring in the same winter week. in 1967, fire on the launch pad killed three astronauts on board apollo 1. including gus grisham, member of the original mercury program. in 1986, the shuttle acc challenger exploded killing all seven on board, including the first teacher in space. the tragedy witnessed by school children shook the nation. >> i know it's hard to understand that sometimes painful things like this happen. it's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. it's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. the future doesn't belong to the faint-hearted. it belongs to the brave. >> finally in 2003, minutes from landing, the space shuttle columbia broke apart on reentry, again killing all seven on board, israeli the first israeli to fly in space. it was later determined piece of foam broke off in launch and damaged a wing. causing the orbiter to break up in the reentry. those seven astronauts were mothers and father who left behind 12 children, among whole became fighter pilot, marine captain and sem
for private citizens are being planned as early as next year. they are teaming up with nasa taking advantage of the open playing field and shared technology. >> regardless whatever reasons nasa has to attract and offer an entree to the private sector to come in and work with them, whatever those reasons are we don't really care. all we know is that the opportunities are here. >> reporter: opportunities that include expanding space programs for other countries. as the industry grows, competition will undoubtedly drive costs down. that presents other problems such as health concerns and government regulations. >> right now the faa only has regulatory authority for launches and reentries of commercial spaceflight. they can't regulate currently on-orbit activities. >> reporter: no doubt that the demand is there. virgin galactic has 500 people booked with deposits of 20,000 each to go into orbit. >> thank you, everybody. >> reporter: we know nasa headquarters both in houston and in florida. the private space race is really all over thewith the span new mexico and here in mojave in california. the
on at least until the end of february, or until president obama names his successor. nasa paused today to remember the lives of seven astronauts who died ten years ago when space shuttle "columbia" broke apart in the air over texas. a few hundred people gathered at kennedy space center in florida, including family members and other astronauts. the accident happened as the shuttle was returning home with only 16 minutes left till landing. the brash, bold-talking former mayor of new york city, ed koch, died today of congestive heart failure at a hospital in new york. >> good morning. i'm ed koch, and i'm running for mayor. how am i doing? >> sreenivasan: ed koch was most at home on the streets of manhattan. a quintessential new yorker, the larger than life koch, who ran city hall from 1978 to 1989, was best known for shepherding new york out of financial ruin, restoring the city's finances through tough budget cuts, and improving its decaying subway system. but he insisted his biggest personal achievement was rallying new yorkers through the 1980 transit strike that crippled the city. st
. >>> so it's hurtling into orbit as we speak at this very moment. coming up, the story behind nasa's latest rocket launch. >>> also ahead, how one young woman's shooting death in chicago has radiated all the way to washington and actually beyond there as well. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help fron
-equipped nasa aircraft will fly over the bay area today and on friday. it will be hovering as low as 1,000 feet collecting air particles samples. the air quality district says that will protect our health by improving the pollution forecast. >>> 8:19. stanford is testing out a new idea to promote safe drinking on campus. the standard daily reports fraternities an sororities received these red cups from the university's office of alcohol policy and education. the plastic cups are marked with black lines making it easier to measure the standard serving size for beer, wine and hard liquor. the goal is to reduce the number of alcohol-related trips to the hospital which have reportedly increased over the past few years. medical researchers have found another reason not to binge drink. doctors in new york say regularly having four or five drinks in one city can contribute to type ii diabetes. binge drinking can interfere with the part of the brain that controls insulin regulation. they add the effects of alcohol are separate from possible wait gabe caused by drinking. >>> and working before you eat b
and louisiana and seven crew members died. today nasa paid tribute to the 17 men and women killed in all three of the space agency's fatal accidents. >>> the intensity of a good football game. when can it be too much? not just physical stress but emotional stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. the stress from floods or earthquakes can trigger heart attacks and death, but the super bowl, they found a super bowl loss by the l.a. rams was associated with more cardyy deaths. the rams' loss to the steelers was a nail-biter. and over eating and drinking and smoking may be part of the problem. >> all of these things lead to the disturbances in the heart rate and how the heart is working. >> he has advice with people with heart disease. >> pay attention particularly to not getting carried away. >> this precaution applies to all smokers and anybody with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes. elizabeth cohen, cnn. [ woman ] my boyfriend and i were going on vacation, so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoe
left. >> brian: right. i'm just hoping that they somehow, nasa, worked out a thing to be able to talk to the monkey without moving the helmet off. >> steve: sure. they've invented so many things, tang, velcro. i'm sure they'll figure this. >> gretchen: our top story today is dangerous twisters and storms and they're tearing across the country. one person has died after a tree fell on a shed. new video showing power lines, traffic lights and trees downed, some homes destroyed. >> i built it out of poured concrete, block up or down solid with rebar and it or it all to piece. i can't imagine what could have hit it. >> gretchen: last night tornadoes tore through mississippi, missouri, and arkansas. mariano molina has been tracking the system. >> very unusual. this is more springtime weather. during the month of april, may or even into june, this is when we should be seeing some of this kind of severe weather. we've had over 200 reports of tornadoes, damaging wind gusts and large size hail. i want to show you why we're seeing this during the month of january. we're seeing extremely warm te
passenger on a plane. nasa space shuttles never left earth without it. >> i tell you, i think we'd be lost without duct tape up here. >> a bandit even used it when he robbed a liquor store. it's enough to give diapers a dirty name. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> you know that dogs are going to smell something. >> that's what i was just thinking, why, oh why, did these women, did anyone think they were going to be able to walk through an airport with cocaine on their tushies? >> put some tape on. >> i'm sure we can all feel bad, but i don't think 9, $10,000 is worth going to jail for a very long time. no more duct tape. >> you can always follow what's going on here in "the situation room."
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)